Yesterday, Ste Packaging – the leading community sources repository for Installer.app and iPhone 3rd party apps – announced that the original jailbreak release for iPhone’s 1.1.3 firmware, from Nate True, had been removed from Installer. Here is a part of the explanation of why Nate’s method was removed: Ever since the dev team released their […]
" />

State of the 1.1.3 iPhone Jailbreak = A Big Mess

iTunesRecovery

Yesterday, Ste Packaging – the leading community sources repository for Installer.app and iPhone 3rd party apps – announced that the original jailbreak release for iPhone’s 1.1.3 firmware, from Nate True, had been removed from Installer.

Here is a part of the explanation of why Nate’s method was removed:

Ever since the dev team released their version of the 1.1.3 jailbreak, there  have been problems, as theirs and the one that Nate True released do not behave the same. The jailbreak released by Nate does not maintain the privilege separation between the “mobile” user, which most apps run as in 1.1.3, and the “root” user. The dev team’s jailbreak preserves this.

Nate’s allowed most apps to continue to run as they had on previous releases. The dev team’s causes many apps to break. The dev team’s is the more correct method, however. Apps need to be rewritten to work in the new environment, rather than hacking the system to allow them to run unmodified.

Some developers are coding their apps to work with Nate’s jailbreak, while others are coding theirs to work with the dev team’s. This is bad. Users can’t tell which jailbreak method an app is targeted to run under and developers don’t know which jailbreak method the user used.

I think this seems a good decision by Ste, but it does serve to highlight just how much of a mess there is now with the state of jailbreaking the 1.1.3 firmware.

If you frequent any of the bigger iPhone forum sites, you’ll know that there is now a huge and confusing array of posts that are How-To’s, Tutorials, and Troubleshooting Guides / Lists of Fixes for one or other of the (far too many) jailbreak methods around.

And, not surprisingly, there are now a large number of posts that run alongiTunesconnect the lines of ‘I’m totally confused.  Which jailbreak method is better / right for me?’.  Sadly, there aren’t really any 100% clear answers for those questions now.  Far from it in fact.  

You can choose to run the Dev Team’s more ‘official’ method, and know that  your iPhone is closer to how we are lead to believe it needs to be in order to be ready for post-SDK applications.  But you’ll also (probably) have a greater number of issues and things that don’t work – though this is of course hotly debated in the forums as well.  Or you can run Nate’s method, which for many of us has resulted in very few and easily fixable problems, but now discover that your phone is probably less close to being ready for ‘legit’ apps when they come down the pipe.  And of course there are now more jailbreak methods (like Arix’s iJailbreakMobile) available and derived from one or other, or both of the initial methods.

If you’re a patient person, and you haven’t yet done a 1.1.3 jailbreak, it is probably a good idea to wait and see what happens now.  Ste have asked Nate to update his method to bring it in line with the Dev Team’s approach, and apparently he is working on this.

I don’t follow the development community closely enough to have any clue as to the rights and wrongs of Nate releasing his method early, or the Dev Team kicking him off the team for doing so.  But … I think it is clear to see that the split has done nothing but harm for modding and jailbreaking in general, and has most likely convinced a lot of ‘on the fence’ users to stick with their stock phones …

The post from Ste explaining the removal of Nate’s release is well worth a read.  Find it at:

Original 1.1.3 Jailbreak Method Removed from Ste Packaging

Continue reading:

TAGS: