Hopefully people reading this know that technology moves at an amazing pace and accept that if one waits for the next great product (or version of a product), you’d never buy anything. However, I and many others, have been on the receiving end of an “early-adopter penalty” when we’ve bought recent Apple products. So, here’s […]
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Never Buy Version 1 of an Apple Product?

Early Adopter Penalties on some Apple Products?

Hopefully people reading this know that technology moves at an amazing pace and accept that if one waits for the next great product (or version of a product), you’d never buy anything.

However, I and many others, have been on the receiving end of an “early-adopter penalty” when we’ve bought recent Apple products.

So, here’s my list of the recent Apple product releases that were improved with Version 2.

I’d be interested in any others that you can recall – either post in the comments or on the Forum.

Also, the list is a warning for all those buying Version 1 of the MacBook Air. Be ready for Version 2 in the autumn, with probably a 120GB or 160GB HDD, a 4GB RAM option, and a 128GB SSD upgrade – all in the same price range as the current 1st generation release. Don’t complain when this happens.

Also, as the MacBook Air is a completely new type of product, early adopters will be the beta testers for Apple. For that I must thank them and I look forward to the improvements they will help drive in Version 2.

Early Adopter Penalties

  • 1st Version MacBook and MacBook Pro: didn’t come with 802.11n wireless (2nd generation allowed turning on 802.11n for $2).
  • 1st Version Airport Extreme Base Station: didn’t come with gigabit ethernet.
  • 1st Version Mac Mini: cheapest model only came with Intel Core Solo CPU.
  • 1st Version iPhone: was $200 more for the first six weeks and buyers only got $100 Apple credit.
  • 1st Version iPod Touch: didn’t come with iPhone features such as Maps, Mail, etc. Has cost early adopters $20 to get these applications added.
  • 1st Version Apple TV: only came in a 40GB version (a 160GB soon followed that many, like myself, would have bought if they hadn’t already bought the 40GB).

I’ve not included in the list the iMac Intel transition, where some people were annoyed that an updated, slimmer PowerPC iMac came out in October 2005, only to be replaced in January 2006 with an Intel version.

Also, Apple’s recent memory upgrades to the iPhone and iPod Touch could be seen as a penalty to early adopters if they would have been willing to pay the additional cost for these units. Personally, I would not have paid for the 32GB iPod Touch, so don’t see the new version as a penalty – but I’m sure others may not be so accepting.

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