Apple has published their annual Supplier Responsibility report which outlines Apple’s efforts to promote responsible business practices through it’s suppliers and partners around the world. Apple requires suppliers to commit to our comprehensive Supplier Code of Conduct as a condition of their contracts with us. We drive compliance with the Code through a rigorous monitoring […]
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Apple Posts Annual Supplier Responsibility Report

Apple has published their annual Supplier Responsibility report which outlines Apple’s efforts to promote responsible business practices through it’s suppliers and partners around the world.

Apple requires suppliers to commit to our comprehensive Supplier Code of Conduct as a condition of their contracts with us. We drive compliance with the Code through a rigorous monitoring program, including factory audits, corrective action plans, and verification measures.

Apple highlights the number of audits of it’s suppliers, claiming that they audited 102 facilities in 2009, which is up from 39 audits in 2007. Apple has also trained 133,000 workers, supervisors, and managers on topics like worker’s rights, and management responsibility. Many of these facilities point out the fact that they have been audited only by Apple, which indicates Apple has strict guidelines and tolerances.

Speaking of guidelines, Apple claims to have developed guidelines in seven areas and how these suppliers can meet Apple’s standards of code of conduct.

Apple found in 2009 only 17 instances of something they call “core violations” of it’s code of conduct. The violations involved things like overcharging of agency recruitment fees to employees, hiring underaged workers, falsifying records, and so on. Apple reports that in each instance they worked with the suppliers to resolve any outstanding issues.

In short, it sounds like Apple is getting out in front of this thing much like they did with their environmental initiative. They are trying to make the company look spotless so if you do criticize them, it’s not in one of these “serious” areas.

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