ITworld is reporting that the recent feud between Apple and Adobe may soon spill over into the courts. Apple has refused to allow Flash (Adobe’s proprietary media spec) onto the iPhone. Most recently however, Apple has moved to block Adobe’s Flash-to-iPhone compiler, it planned (plans?) to ship as part of Flash Professional CS5. Usually I […]
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Adobe Prepping Lawsuit Against Apple?

ITworld is reporting that the recent feud between Apple and Adobe may soon spill over into the courts. Apple has refused to allow Flash (Adobe’s proprietary media spec) onto the iPhone. Most recently however, Apple has moved to block Adobe’s Flash-to-iPhone compiler, it planned (plans?) to ship as part of Flash Professional CS5.

Usually I write about security here, but Apple’s iron-bound determination to keep Adobe Flash out of any iWhatever device is about to blow up in Apple’s face. Sources close to Adobe tell me that Adobe will be suing Apple within a few weeks.

It was bad enough when Apple said, in effect, that Adobe Flash wasn’t good enough to be allowed on the iPad. But the final straw was when Apple changed its iPhone SDK (software development kit) license so that developers may not submit programs to Apple that use cross-platform compilers.

As Flash is falling out of favor with web developers as they switch to HTML5, Adobe is looking for anybody to blame, and it may very well be that Apple’s standards compliant platform is the catalyst for these events. That way, Apple makes a great scapegoat.

Regardless, I believe Apple is safe, at bare minimum on a legal level, and likely on a market share level as well. I mean, Apple has done nothing outside of it’s right to do. Apple does not have to allow Flash on the iPhone, even if it is popular.

So, if Flash fails, it’s only Adobe’s fault. Really, if it was an outstanding way to deliver content we wouldn’t be talking about it right now.

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