I know that Instapaper is mega popular, and I may well give the web-to-text service another shot someday, but for now, I’m really enjoying Read it Later. I’m currently using the free app to aggregate all the interesting links from my Twitter and Google Reader accounts. Yes, you read that correctly: I’m using a secondary […]
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Quick iPhone Tip: use Read it Later to save Twitter and RSS links in one place

I know that Instapaper is mega popular, and I may well give the web-to-text service another shot someday, but for now, I’m really enjoying Read it Later. I’m currently using the free app to aggregate all the interesting links from my Twitter and Google Reader accounts.

Yes, you read that correctly: I’m using a secondary aggregator to further organize the stuff from my primary aggregators. Heck, this probably doesn’t actually classify as a tip, but more of a “hey, check out Read it Later” post, since what I’m describing is exactly what the service is for.

The main advantage of using RIL is that it allows me to meta-star links from my iPhone or Mac that I’d like to keep for posting or archiving. Google Reader and Twitter both have starring systems, but until recently, I’ve had to check them both separately, and it’s been a pain to deal with doubles. I tried using Twitter as a replacement for RSS, but I’m finding it to be a different beast altogether, and most blogs link only their biggest headlines to Twitter, and leave the rest to RSS. So Google Reader stays in my workflow for now. Having programs (Reeder and Tweetie 2) that throw links right into RIL means that I can surf Twitter and Greader separately, and simply check RIL once I’m ready to get down to writing.

Read It Later is accessible on my browser (Chrome) and via native iPhone app, so accessing full versions of my links is never a problem. The one curious part that I haven’t quite been to figure out is RIL’s text view. The app can download text-only versions of your links (much like Instapaper, I imagine), but this system uses a very special scroll bar on the iPhone. This quick scroll bar acts like ones on the desktop (tap and hold to pan or jump down the screen) and disappears after a few seconds, if left idle. The problem I have is that bringing it back up tends to jump the text view up or down a notch — no matter where I touch the screen. Simply put: unless I leave the scrollbar on screen at all times by holding it down, there’s no way for me to easily read in text view.

However, that minor issue aside, I’m quite in love with Read it Later, and am amazed how much I’ve been able to do with just the free app. I took a peek at what the premium version offers, but, so far, it hasn’t been enough to tempt me to spend $4.99. Anyone around here a fan of Read it Later or Instapaper? And if you’ve got a solution to my text view problem, please do share — I even looked it up in the support forum and found no answers.

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