Putting your apps into folders certainly isn’t rocket science. Drag one app onto another and they will pro-create, disappear, and re-appear as mini versions of themselves inside a folder. But there are all sorts of little ways you can organize your apps, and after the jump you can find a few of our little tips […]
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A few notes on iOS 4 folders

Putting your apps into folders certainly isn’t rocket science. Drag one app onto another and they will pro-create, disappear, and re-appear as mini versions of themselves inside a folder. But there are all sorts of little ways you can organize your apps, and after the jump you can find a few of our little tips / preferences for sorting the hundreds of iPhone apps we’ve downloaded over the years.

General tips:

It’s also been pointed out on Twitter (@Razorianfly was one of the first sources, I think) that you can use Emoji icons for folder names — a very cool way to differentiate gaming folders. This post on SimonBlog shows you how to use the “Emoji Free” app to enable a specialized emoji keyboard.

Use the Apple Logo in your folder titles on iPhone J.D. (via Diego Petrucci)

Thomas
Some of my folders are pretty simple. Games, for example, are all lumped into one place because I don’t do much gaming on my iPhone outside of review items and a few favourites. My other sections are a bit more detailed, though, and I’ve found the solution that works best for me is to avoid sorting strictly by App Store categories.

I’ve got a folder called Measure for anything that involves tallying, converting, or reporting anything, and I’ve thrown Ego, Consume, Convert, Convertbot, and Multitimers right in there.

Another folder simply titled Online is for apps that don’t really use local storage. Flickit, Dropbox (debatable, I know), Mailroom, WordPress, Tumblr, TD, Paypal, and Dragon Dictation reside within.

The last little folder I’d like to mention is one called Reference, which is simply for apps that I’ll refer to often for information. IMDB and Articles can be found in Reference, but I’ve also thrown MoviesNow in as well, since it’s my go-to app for checking movie schedules.

Frank
My approach was very simplistic. All of my games are in Game folders

numbered 1-3. All of the utility apps: like Dropbox, RedLaser, and

Convertbot are in two Utility folders. My music and video apps:

Pandora, YouTube, and iPod are all in a folder titled Media.

Ultimately, I just tried to keep things simple and I also labeled my

folders using Emoji icons which look pretty cool. I went from ten home

screens to just two. Thank you Apple!

Jay
First, I find that most of the way Apple organizes apps is sufficient (Utilities, Productivity, etc.) and I also added “Media” (where Orb, Last.fm, Pandora, NPR, iBooks, & Kindle reside).

Next, one thing I have found beneficial is labeling folders with a User Name. With 2 boys (7 years old & 3 years old), each has their own folder(s) with their names on it. This especially helps keeping the youngest one from starting apps that I would prefer him not to.

As long as games don’t remain active through multitasking, folders are a definite improvement.

Matt
I simply put all of my apps into 3 game folders, 3 utility folders (Apple apps, 3rd party utility apps), 1 social networking folder, and 1 entertainment folder for “toys” (shotgun pro type apps). I would like to note that the apps I use the most are still “folder free” for quicker access (app store, photo, camera, calendar and SMS). My dock is still the same since iOS 1.0)

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