As MacRumors points out, Apple has released a software update that is required for the newly released MagicTrackpad to function when paired with your Mac. That same update however, also offers inertial scrolling to some older MacBook and MacBook Pro models. Inertial scrolling of course, debuted when the current MacBook Pro models were released last […]
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MagicTrackpad Update Brings Inertial Scrolling and Three-Finger Drag Gesture To Older Notebook Models

As MacRumors points out, Apple has released a software update that is required for the newly released MagicTrackpad to function when paired with your Mac. That same update however, also offers inertial scrolling to some older MacBook and MacBook Pro models. Inertial scrolling of course, debuted when the current MacBook Pro models were released last spring. The update also offers a three-finger window dragging gesture as well.

The MacBook Air and “Early 2008” MacBook Pro models only gain the inertial scrolling feature, but all other Apple notebook models made since then can support these new gestures.

Here are the supported models as seen in Apple’s official support document:

Inertial Scrolling and Three-Finger Drag Gesture Support

These Mac portables support inertial scrolling and the three-finger drag gesture after you install Magic Trackpad and Multi-Touch Trackpad Update 1.0:

MacBook
MacBook (13-inch, Early 2009)
MacBook (13-inch, Mid 2009)
MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009)
MacBook (13-inch, Aluminum, Late 2008)

MacBook Pro
MacBook Pro (17-inch, Mid 2010)
MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2010)
MacBook Pro (17-inch, Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2.53 GHz, Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2009)
MacBook Pro (17-inch, Late 2008)

The following Mac portables support inertial scrolling after installing Magic Trackpad and Multi-Touch Trackpad Update 1.0:

MacBook Air
MacBook Air
MacBook Air (Mid 2009)

MacBook Pro
MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2008)
MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2008)

Inertial scrolling requires little explanation. You can think of it as the “rubber-banding” users experience when scrolling through a webpage in Mobile Safari on any of Apple’s iOS devices.

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