The Baltimore Sun is reporting that Apple has finalized a deal with Liquidmetal Technologies, in order to use the small metal company’s advanced “amorphous” metal alloys. This news was discovered in a filling with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission where it is outlined that Apple has been granted the rights to use Liquidmetal’s technologies […]
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Apple Gains The Rights to Liquidmetal Technologies' Advanced Metal Alloys

The Baltimore Sun is reporting that Apple has finalized a deal with Liquidmetal Technologies, in order to use the small metal company’s advanced “amorphous” metal alloys. This news was discovered in a filling with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission where it is outlined that Apple has been granted the rights to use Liquidmetal’s technologies in the consumer electronics arena, while Liquidmetal holds the rights in all other fields.

On August 5, 2010, Liquidmetal Technologies, Inc., a Delaware corporation (“Liquidmetal”), entered into a Master Transaction Agreement with Apple Inc., a California corporation (“Apple”), pursuant to which (i) Liquidmetal contributed substantially all of its intellectual property assets to a newly organized special-purpose, wholly-owned subsidiary (the “IP Company”), (ii) the IP Company granted to Apple a perpetual, worldwide, fully-paid, exclusive license to commercialize such intellectual property in the field of consumer electronic products in exchange for a license fee, and (iii) the IP Company granted back to Liquidmetal a perpetual, worldwide, fully-paid, exclusive license to commercialize such intellectual property in all other fields of use (together with all ancillary agreements, the “Master Transaction Agreement”).

Liquidmetal’s description of the technology they have developed, states that their new metal alloys display “amorphous” properties. This differs from traditional metals that have a crystalline molecular structure.

This amorphous atomic structure leads to a unique set of characteristic properties for the family of Liquidmetal alloys.

These characteristic properties are:

– High Yield Strength
– High Hardness
– Superior Strength/Weight Ratio
– Superior Elastic Limit
– High Corrosion Resistance
– High Wear-Resistance
– Unique Acoustical Properties

It goes without saying, that know one knows what Apple intends to do with this technology, but it’s a pretty safe bet it has to do with their product lines’ enclosures. Apple’s current industrial design trend would be a perfect place for this technology.

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