Robert Scoble has a good post up about mobile apps, the fact that he has hundreds of them on his iPhone, and how he uses them. Some of it is in response to people asking him whether he is really able to use all the apps he has installed on his iPhone. As you can […]
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Recommended: Scoble on Mobile Apps & Using Hundreds of Them

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Robert Scoble has a good post up about mobile apps, the fact that he has hundreds of them on his iPhone, and how he uses them. Some of it is in response to people asking him whether he is really able to use all the apps he has installed on his iPhone. As you can see in his home screen screencap above, he has a ton of apps. He says his total is 359, though the screencap shows he may have culled that down to somewhere below 190 in terms of those that are actually on his phone now (or whenever that screenie was taken).

A couple of his points that hit home for me are these:

Back to the question: do you really use all those mobile apps? Quick answer: no. But I use most of them enough to keep them on my phone. Certainly I use enough of them to demonstrate to you why apps are becoming hugely important to your next purchase decision (phones that don’t have many apps shouldn’t get supported by you because most of the functionality of phones now exists in the apps, not in the device itself).

I think this a great point, and also likely a huge concern for RIM (makers of Blackberry), Microsoft, and all the other mobile platform players. It’s one of the places where iOS has a big lead on the others and one that doesn’t show much sign of narrowing.

Scoble also talks about using Spotlight Search to launch apps, a method that many of us find effective once we have built up a large number of apps / folders / home screens on our devices. And he points out some of the major problems with this approach:

1. Search on the iPhone sucks because it mixes in contacts with apps. Makes it a little hard to find things. I have 8,000 contacts, though, so my experience is different than most normal users.
2. Lots of apps don’t include in the name what it does. Foursquare, for instance, lets you check in at various places. Or, it’s a location-based service. But try searching for “check in” or “location” and you’ll never find Foursquare. I’ve found lots of apps have been named in such a way that you’ll never find them if you search for what they do. “Find new iPhone apps” won’t pull up “Chomp,” for instance. So, that still requires you to remember the names of the apps, which most people can’t do over 100 apps. Real problem here.

I can’t say I’d thought of these before, but I think they’re both very true.

Anyway, Scoble’s whole post is well worth a read – check it out here:

http://scobleizer.com/2010/11/20/test-run-techcrunch-guest-post-do-you-really-use-all-those-mobile-apps/

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