CNET is reporting that Microsoft, in their ongoing campaign to stop Apple from acquiring a trademark for the “App Store” term, has brought in a linguist to counter Apple’s own expert input on the genericness of the term. That is what this is all about- Microsoft doesn’t want Apple to trademark the term, because they […]
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Microsoft Has Linguist Weigh In on the ‘App Store’ Trademark Dispute

microsoft-logo.jpgCNET is reporting that Microsoft, in their ongoing campaign to stop Apple from acquiring a trademark for the “App Store” term, has brought in a linguist to counter Apple’s own expert input on the genericness of the term. That is what this is all about- Microsoft doesn’t want Apple to trademark the term, because they believe it’s a generic term.
Here’s an excerpt:

Microsoft struck back in a separate declaration filed today by linguistic expert Ronald R. Butters that attempts to poke holes in [Apple’s hired linguist Robert A.] Leonard’s claims, saying “the compound noun ‘app store’ means simply ‘store at which apps are offered for sale,’ which is merely a definition of the thing itself–a generic characterization.”

Butters also knocks Leonard’s sourcing of online dictionaries that had spelled out Apple’s ties to the App Store moniker. “The online ‘dictionary’ sources Leonard cites were not written by established lexicographers and are without scientific authority,” Butters wrote. “Even so, he included an online source that does, in fact, define app store as a generic term.”

Microsoft points to several other companies, including Amazon’s recently launched Amazon AppStore, as proof that the term is generic.

If you ask me, it looks as if Apple is losing this fight. However, as I’ve pointed out before, Microsoft is just as guilty of trademarking a generic term- Windows. Oh, and one other thought: Linguist? Really?

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