Late last week, MacRumors broke a story wherein they received notice from Rob Gloess of Computer Logic X, an iOS developer, that his company has come under legal fire from Lodsys. Currently, Lodsys is only threatening to file suit over the use of an “upgrade” button in the lite version of Computer LogicX’s application where […]
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Lodsys Threatens Suit Against iOS Developers Over In-App Purchases, Upgrade Link

apples-app-store-icon-o.jpgLate last week, MacRumors broke a story wherein they received notice from Rob Gloess of Computer Logic X, an iOS developer, that his company has come under legal fire from Lodsys. Currently, Lodsys is only threatening to file suit over the use of an “upgrade” button in the lite version of Computer LogicX’s application where users can upgrade to the full, paid version.

Lodsys claims that the patent in question being infringed upon is patent # 7222078, which was filed in December of 2003. This patent was part continuations of a patent filed all the way back in 1992. The patent was originally filed by Dan Abelow, who in 2004 sold his collection of patent to Lodsys.

MacRumors then points to a Cult of Mac report, which claims that James Thomson, the developer of the famous PCalc, has been hit with a similar notice. Thomson did not however, reveal who was threatening the suit, but it’s a safe bet, due to timing, that Lodsys was also behind this notice as well.

The report goes on to say that Thomson contacted Apple regarding the issue, and that the patent holder demands a license be negotiated within 21 days, or a suit will be filed.

Lodsys had done this before, but attacking bigger players, with the threat of an infringement suit over the same patent. I suspect that Apple will step into this mess, so as to prevent all of their developers utilizing in-app purchases from being ran off, and thus devaluing the platform. At least, that’s what Apple should do. Besides, Lodsys is nothing more than a patent holdings company, who trolls around looking for anyone they think they can slap with an infringement suit. It would be different if an actual third-party was having their toes stepped on by the actions of the Apple community. Alas, they are not.

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