Jonathan over at tldtoday (which stands for Techfast, Lunch, and Dinner Today – tee hee) posted a video recently where he wonders, out loud, whether the iPad 2 a bad Holiday gift makes. The gist of it is this: new iPads tend to come out earlier in the year, and late 2011 is close enough […]
" />

Don’t Worry, The iPad 2 Makes a Fine Gift

isource merry christmas

Jonathan over at tldtoday (which stands for Techfast, Lunch, and Dinner Today – tee hee) posted a video recently where he wonders, out loud, whether the iPad 2 a bad Holiday gift makes. The gist of it is this: new iPads tend to come out earlier in the year, and late 2011 is close enough to early 2012 that your shiny new $500 tablet may only stay shiny for three or four months.

Frankly, I don’t really see this as a problem. I think early adopters and tablet-curious folks have already had months and months, or birthdays upon birthdays, to ask friends and family for an Apple slate. So it’s my thinking that the people who will unwrap iPad 2s this season will simply be delighted by the gift, and won’t perceive a diminishment of value once an iPad 2 HD, or iPad 3 comes out. The iPad 2 won’t actually *lose* any of its current capabilities when a new model comes out, and Apple products tend to re-sell very nicely, so there’s very little actual deterioration anywhere in this scenario.

That’s because the release of a new Apple product, outside of jumps like the iPod Nano to the iPod Touch, is usually evolutionary, rather than revolutionary. The iPad 2 will still be a fine product for reading, surfing, gaming, painting, and writing, even if the next one has some sort of nearly-Retina display and a set of magnetic opposable thumbs.

Then there’s the matter of how much more powerful devices have become in the last two generations. The iPhone 4 was really the start of this. The 3GS was faster than the 3G, but that was really relative, because the 3G models I’ve seen have been real slouches. My old iPhone 2G is the same. The iPhone 4, on the other hand, really raised the bar in terms of general device speed – much more so than iPhones that came before it. There may have been a slight speed hit when moving to iOS 5, but it’s nothing my iPhone 4 wielding friends have complained about.

That’s because I think we’re getting to the point where the base speed of devices is getting so high that newer models will find it harder to feel like more than just marginal upgrades. A 100% speed increase is more noticeable when you’re cutting six seconds down to three, than when you’re cutting a second in half.

I don’t think there was any malicious or snobby intent in Jonathan’s initial post, but I definitely disagree. A bad gift would be an iPad that slowly decomposes into soil over four months, a rip-off running the Kindle Fire OS (ok now I’m just being a douche), or a useless display unit. Those who have actual 10″ Cupertablets waiting for them under the tree this year have nothing to fear in the months to come.

Continue reading:

TAGS: