Everybody knows that when it’s cloudy, there will always be a chance of meatballs, and the thing about meatballs is that they don’t let you sync properly (vegetarian-friendly metaphor coming later on). This has been my experience with iCloud Sync in the excellent Day One journal app. The cool thing about iCloud is that it’s […]
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iCloud Sync: Not Quite There Yet (Oh, and Long Live Dropbox)

Everybody knows that when it’s cloudy, there will always be a chance of meatballs, and the thing about meatballs is that they don’t let you sync properly (vegetarian-friendly metaphor coming later on). This has been my experience with iCloud Sync in the excellent Day One journal app.

The cool thing about iCloud is that it’s supposed to be effortless wireless syncing. Once your Apple device is set up properly, you shouldn’t have to worry about logging in again. All you have to do is activate iCloud sync and all of the Day One entries on your iPad, iPhone, and Mac will magically talk to each other and spread themselves across all of your devices. Except for when they don’t.

For whatever reason, I’ve found iCloud syncing with Day One to be very unreliable. Due to the way iCloud is setup, there is no option to manually start a sync and there’s also no real indicator, aside from what’s on the status bar, to show when a sync is happening. I’ve been using the newest version of Day One for about a week now and have found the syncing to be intermittent at best. It works most days, but sometimes, entries will just sit there, locked on my Mac or on my iPhone, and refuse to budge (just like in one of those real paper journals – ewwww).

The answer to all of this, of course, has been to return to Dropbox for syncing. I can pull down to refresh, the syncs start reliably upon startup, and I’ve had no problems whatsoever. I don’t really blame the Day One devs for the issues because I’ve had a few iCloud problems across the board (music and app purchases still don’t automatically start on my iPad and iPhone), but if I’ve learned any little lesson from all of this, it’s that Dropbox is still very much the king of sync on iOS. No regrets about naming it my Pick of the Year.

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