I love using iPhoto for photo touch-ups and sharing pictures on Facebook, but I’m still getting used to the way it handles its image library. Apple created iPhoto with non-destructive editing in mind, so iPhoto’s library is always kept separate from the system-wide photos (like Photo Stream and Camera Roll). I’m still getting used to […]
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Flags Vs. Favorites in iPhoto for iOS

I love using iPhoto for photo touch-ups and sharing pictures on Facebook, but I’m still getting used to the way it handles its image library. Apple created iPhoto with non-destructive editing in mind, so iPhoto’s library is always kept separate from the system-wide photos (like Photo Stream and Camera Roll). I’m still getting used to iPhoto, but one big step in the right direction was reading Andy Ihnatko’s in-depth iPhoto review, which highlights the differences between flagging and favoriting photos. Flagging a photo will simply mark it and place it in a separate “Flagged” album. Favoriting a photo (using the medal button) will yield similar results, but will also keep the photo around after you’ve deleted the original from the Camera Roll. If that’s a bit confusing, think of it this way: if you really want to make sure you keep a copy of a photo, just add it to your favorites. That photo will then stay there until you delete it or un-favorite it.

So the way I’m trying to work with iPhoto now is this:

  1. Snap a picture on the 4S
  2. Browse the Camera Roll using iPhoto and favorite the best shots
  3. Filter out all non-favorite pictures (or head to the Favorites album)
  4. Edit the newest Favorites
  5. Export the edited Favorites to iTunes
  6. Head to iTunes on my Mac, grab the exported images from the iPhoto Shared Folder, and import these final shots into my Mac’s photo library

It’s not a straightforward process, but it does mean that what I end up importing on my Mac are only the keepers, and none of the blurry, crappy shots I took while laughing. I’m telling myself that this will ultimately save me space and time in the long run…but it could simply mean that I just want to use iPhoto just a little too much. We’ll see how long this workflow lasts.

 

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