Seven years ago at the keynote kicking off WWDC 2005, Steve Jobs, who was very much alive and well, announced that Mac OS X would be making the transition to Intel processors. This came as a shock considering that all of Apple’s Macs had been based on the PowerPC processor platform from IBM for the past […]
" />

How Mac OS X Made it to Intel

Macosx box big

Seven years ago at the keynote kicking off WWDC 2005, Steve Jobs, who was very much alive and well, announced that Mac OS X would be making the transition to Intel processors. This came as a shock considering that all of Apple’s Macs had been based on the PowerPC processor platform from IBM for the past decade . In hindsight, its obvious why Apple made the move. But at the time, it was an announcement that caused quite an uproar.

At the announcement Jobs noted that every major release of Mac OS X up to that point had also been compiled, in secret, to work on Intel as well as PowerPC. So, when the time was right, Apple could seamlessly transition to the new architecture.

Years later, via Quara, Kim Scheinberg tells the story of her husband, JK (for anonymity no doubt), and how the desire to move closer to their parents on the east coast so their one year old son Max could be near his grandparents kicked off the project to bring Mac OS X to Intel. The long and short of the story is this: JK wanted to telecommute to Apple while living on the east coast, and to do so he needed to find a project to work on by himself or to lead. He decided to get Mac OS X to run on Intel processors. The project started out small, and only grew to a dozen or so engineers by summer of 2002.

The entire post isn’t very long, and gives us insight into how Apple operates, and their devotion to secrecy. Besides, it’s a fascinating story of how Mac OS X made it’s way to Intel, and an excellent story to kick off WWDC 2012.

Continue reading:

TAGS: