Those clever folks at iFixit got hold of the monster new MacBook Pro with Retina Display earlier this week, and subjected it to their standard comprehensive teardown. If you haven’t seen one of these before you’re missing out – these are full-on rip the guts out, identify all the parts and review every detail dissections […]
" />

iFixit’s Teardown of the New MacBook Pro with Retina Display Highlights a Major Drawback

MacBook Pro with Retina Display Teardown

Those clever folks at iFixit got hold of the monster new MacBook Pro with Retina Display earlier this week, and subjected it to their standard comprehensive teardown. If you haven’t seen one of these before you’re missing out – these are full-on rip the guts out, identify all the parts and review every detail dissections of the latest tech products.

This week’s look at the new MacBook Pro is a teardown in more ways than one. While it reveals and confirms the incredibly high specs of the mother of all MacBook Pros, it also highlights one huge drawback as well – the MBP scores terribly when it comes to its repairability score. It gets just a 1 out of 10 (with 10 being easiest to repair) for the following reasons:

  • Proprietary pentalobe screws prevent you from gaining access to anything inside.

  • As in the MacBook Air, the RAM is soldered to the logic board. Max out at 16GB now, or forever hold your peace—you can’t upgrade.

  • The proprietary SSD isn’t upgradeable either (yet), as it is similar but not identical to the one in the Air. It is a separate daughtercard, and we’re hopeful we can offer an upgrade in the near future.

  • The lithium-polymer battery is glued rather than screwed into the case, which increases the chances that it’ll break during disassembly. The battery also covers the trackpad cable, which tremendously increases the chance that the user will shear the cable in the battery removal process.

  • The display assembly is completely fused, and there’s no glass protecting it. If anything ever fails inside the display, you will need to replace the entire extremely expensive assembly.

You can check out the full teardown of the new MBP by iFixit here: http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/MacBook-Pro-with-Retina-Display-Teardown/9462/1#.T9tif-JYvB5

So it looks like repairing or upgrading the new MBP will be extremely difficult at best and impossible in some cases. This is a major concern when we’re talking about a powerhouse, top of the line laptop (with a top of the line pricetag), a machine that should serve well for at least three years or more for most users.

The new MacBook Pro is out of my league on price, but even if it was within my budget this issue would likely be enough to have me choose another option.

What do you all think of this aspect of the new MacBook Pro with retina display? Is this a concern for you at all?

Continue reading:

TAGS: