Here’s a story about why it’s probably better to Keep It Simple, Stupid. For the past three or four weeks I have been experiencing some very irritating iPad 2 wi-fi issues. The iPad simply would not stay connected to my local wireless network for more than five minutes at a time. I’d be reading RSS […]
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The Simple Solution To My iPad Wi-Fi Problem

Here’s a story about why it’s probably better to Keep It Simple, Stupid. For the past three or four weeks I have been experiencing some very irritating iPad 2 wi-fi issues. The iPad simply would not stay connected to my local wireless network for more than five minutes at a time. I’d be reading RSS feeds, tap on an item, and then growl as my iPad stupidly told me it was offline. I normally love my iPad, but there were times where I wanted to tell it to go straight to hell.

The problem was driving me absolutely nuts, so I took to the net for research and compiled a list of notes from various forum threads complaining about wi-fi issues on the iPad. The following list is just a sample of possible solutions I found online:

  • switch router to wireless g only?
  • switch to wpa2 password?
  • set router beacon interval to 50
  • set router channel to 11
  • turn on mac filtering and add systems to mac filter
  • turn off qos/wm (I don’t know what this even means)

But, as it turns out, I didn’t really need any of those fancier fixes. I mentioned my connectivity issue during one of my weekly talks with Patrick Jordan (of iSource fame) and he asked me whether I’d tried moving my router around recently. This reminded me that my roommate had indeed moved our router. It had been transplanted 1.5 feet from its original position in the living room to a comfy seat atop an old microwave, underneath the kitchen table.

So last week I moved the router higher up, onto an unused chair, and have been enjoying stutter-free wi-fi on the iPad 2 ever since. It was that simple. I wouldn’t call this a tip by any means, but simply a friendly reminder that some technical fixes are a lot simpler than we expect them to be. Sometimes you just need to pick something up, or make sure a cable is plugged in, before heading to the net for vast amounts of research.

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