Apple CEO Tim Cook sat down for the second year in a row with Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher at the All Things Digital conference. There he answered, or dodged a series of questions, regarding Apple, the future of the company, and yes, products.
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Tim Cook’s D11 Interview- Apple TV and wearable computing


Yesterday evening Apple CEO Tim Cook for the second year in a row, sat down with Walt Mossberg and kara Swisher at the All Things Digital conference. Just as his predecessor did, Cook answered or dodged many questions from the pair. However, Cook did reveal a few notable things regarding products.

First off, when pressed about the television market, Cook responded by saying that the television experience could be better. He was then asked if deals with content providers is the reason there has been little visible movement from Apple in this area. Cook declined to answer. He did note however, that the company has a “grand vision” for the television market.

In short, more of what we’ve heard, but perhaps we’re closer to an actual, shipping product than we were a year ago.

To me, this is one of those rumors that will not die until something, anything, more than the current Apple TV set-top box is introduced.  Just like the Beatles + iTunes rumors that floated around for years, this “iTV” set of rumors won’t go away until Apple makes another major move.

Another area of discussion was that of “wearable” computing. Cook stated that he thought wearables were “incredibly interesting” and feels that it could be a “profound area”. That said, and despite the fact he was wearing a Nike Fuelband (he’s on the Board), he also noted that there was nothing “great” on the market.

Of course, Mossberg and Swisher did their job and pressed Cook on the matter. He dodged, but suggested that glasses and wristwatches had drawbacks. He did note however, that the wrist was a “natural” location for such a device.

Here, I think Cook is on to something. Glasses, traditionally, are worn by people who have to wear them. They are also fashion statements mostly because they sit on your face for the whole world to see. That is, glasses are so prominently placed, and people are so sensitive about style, that glasses almost seem doomed. The wrist, as a location for a wearable computing device, does seem natural. It’s easily accessible while remaining out of the way. At this early date, I would wager that Apple will not be making a wristwatch, at least not one as we think of it today.

So, we know little more than before the interview, except that Apple is investigating these areas, and apparently does not feel the need to move on it yet. I would say that the wearable computing market is in its adolescence and Apple has time. I feel that Apple is running out of time in regards to capturing the TV market. Competitors such as Microsoft, have laid out their plans for the future in this market. Perhaps something is up their sleeve and coming this fall. Either way, it doesn’t seem like their in a hurry.


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  • Renkman

    Really curious what he means by “wearable” computing. I agree glasses aren’t for everyone, and even though watches might be an easier sell, I have a feeling we are missing the direction Apple is going with this.