The iPad Air is the most difficult iPad yet to work on--period. Not exactly what repair specialists want to hear, but definitely the current trend in the mobile tech world in general. Why is it the iPad Air so difficult to work on you ask?
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iPad Air teardown reveals most difficult iPad to repair

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The incredibly adventurous folks over at iFixit have done it again–they have torn apart systematically disassembled the new iPad Air so we can all see exactly what Apple’s newest device is made of on the inside. Not only that but they show us a very detailed step-by-step breakdown of just exactly how they do it.

So, what did they discover?  The iPad Air is the most difficult iPad yet to work on.  Not exactly what repair specialists want to hear, but definitely the current trend in the manner in which Apple, and the mobile tech world in general have been progressing in recent years.  Why is it the iPad Air so difficult to work on you ask? Well for one glue–lots and lots of glue to hold it all together rather than screws like we saw in the past.  iFxit gave it a rating of 2/10 in repairability, where 10 was very easy to repair, and 1 was very difficult.

iPad-Air-Teardown

One of the most notable observations made during the teardown were that glue is used in excess–EVERYWHERE!  The front panel is glued to the rest of the device.  This is especially problematic for the DIY-er as it greatly increases the chances that you will indeed crack the glass during the repair, which would pretty much stop you in your tracks and add more trouble than its worth at that point.  I’m not sure if there is an ulterior motive here, or if glue is just easier to apply than installing screws.

With the addition of so much glue, iFixit reported that this was the most difficult battery removal procedure they have ever seen while taking apart an iPad.  Other issues discovered during the disassembly was that you can’t access the front panel’s connector until you remove the LCD screen, and the LCD has a “foam sticky tape” adhering it to the front panel–also increasing the chances that it will be destroyed during the removal process.

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All-in-all, it sounds like a real pain in the arse.  Hats off to iFixit and their whole team.  I’m glad there are still professionals like iFixit willing to dive in and take apart the electronic devices we love to buy.  When we get to see how our devices are made/assembled it really adds some insight we couldn’t appreciate otherwise.  The video below gives a nice step-by-step visual of the whole process if you are interested.

 

 

[images: iFixit]

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