While many signs seem to indicate that OS X is losing favor to iOS in terms of Apple’s design philosophy, the trend won’t culminate with the merger of the company’s two core operating systems, according to top Apple executives.
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Apple has no plans to merge iOS and OS X as they work to make the two operate in harmony

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While many signs seem to indicate that OS X is losing favor to iOS in terms of Apple’s design philosophy, the trend won’t culminate with the merger of the company’s two core operating systems, according to top Apple executives. Speaking to Macworld for the Mac’s 30th anniversary, Phil Schiller, Craig Federighi, and Bud Tribble all chimed in on the matter. 

Schiller called merging the two operating systems “a waste of energy.” Federighi further clarified how unlikely such a huge software shakeup would be, noting that OS X has evolved based on how users interact with the platform — that is, with a mouse and keyboard. The two see attempts at making tablets and phones more PC-like and PCs more like mobile devices as misguided.

The group did acknowledge the changes that have come to OS X as a direct result of iOS’ growing popularity, but stress that such tweaks have carried the goal of consistency in mind. It makes sense for apps and core services to be shared between the two, and Apple will no doubt continue to refine the look of each to better reflect an overall design philosophy.

But we have to agree. Turning our Macs into iOS devices just doesn’t make much sense from a  usability perspective. Don’t expect the day to come anytime soon, especially not with OS X 10.10, which is currently in development and could launch later this year.

[9to5Mac via Macworld]

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  • If Apple’s determined to keep all touchscreen interaction off of its “PC Class” devices forever, they may be missing out. It’s not that you’d ever do everything or even most things with touch, but there are some cool things you can do with it – more or less depending on the application.

    There’s a lot of interesting stuff going on in the hybrid space, for another example, and I for one don’t see the Android/Windows experiments as going nowhere, based on the majority Win machines eventually becoming mostly touch-capable as the tech to add it becomes more commoditized. That is, I can see a number of scenarios where I might want to dip into one of my Android apps in the middle of some Win work (though apparently Chrome OS may produce yet other ways of working).

    My long-term plan was a top Apple laptop running Win in VM Ware – but since Windows will soon have modern UI versions of its major apps, the Windows my work requires feels less and less like a value add on a non-touch enabled device going forward.

    And I’m not the kind of guy who’ll build his own Hackintosh, so the future could see me (wistfully) leaving the Apple fold entirely.

    Still, there’s an iPad on my shopping list…..