Typically, the most important upgrades to the newest version of the iPhone each year center around changes and improvements to the camera. This year is shaping up to be no different, with Apple thought to be focusing on maintaining, and possibly even reducing an already thin profile
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Will the rumored updates to the iPhone 6 camera be a game changer for Apple?

iphone-camera

Typically, the most important upgrades to the newest version of the iPhone each year center around changes and improvements to the camera.  This year is shaping up to be no different.  However, with Apple thought to be focusing on maintaining, and possibly even reducing an already thin profile–the addition of optical image stabilization could now be on the back-burner–or is it?

Recently we have seen mocked-up versions of the iPhone 6 that seem to include the protruding camera lens that might be required in the iPhone form factor in order to house image stabilization.  Perhaps, just perhaps, Apple is indeed releasing two form factors/screen sizes this year for the iPhone 6?  A larger (5.5-5.7″) version could have image stabilization, with the often talked about, smaller version (4.7″) not including this feature?  This scenario seems highly unlikely, but anything is still possible when you are considering design differences in hypothetical, unannounced products.

The iPhone 5S uses Apple’s SoC’s processor to enable software-based image stabilization. Perhaps a protruding camera lens could provide optical stabilization since components of this type are generally larger and hard to squeeze into a thinner profile?

What about the pixel size of the new iPhone camera? A separate report from Chinese analyst Sun Chang Xu, has indicated that the iPhone 6 will have a substantially larger pixel size–1.75 micrometers compared with 1.5 micrometers pixel size of the iPhone 5s’s camera.  A jump of this magnitude in pixel size would definitely increase picture quality by allowing more light to be captured with each photo.  This would not only benefit regular, everyday pictures, but also in low-light conditions which are often the hardest hurdle to overcome for mobile phones.

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